The Catacombs of Paris: A Journey Through the Undercity    

Bookmark (0)

No account yet? Register

The Catacombs of Paris, what are they?

The Catacombs of Paris are a network of subterranean tunnels and caves that were used to store the bones of some six million people. The catacombs were created in the 18th century to alleviate overcrowding in the city’s cemeteries. The tunnels are located 20 metres (65 ft) below ground and are only accessible via a narrow, spiral staircase.

The Catacombs are a popular tourist attraction in Paris, with around 250,000 people visiting each year. Visitors must descend a long flight of stairs to reach the tunnels, which are not lit and can be cramped and slippery. The experience is not for the faint-hearted, but those who do brave the journey are rewarded with an eerie and fascinating insight into Paris’ past.

Brief history of the Catacombs of Paris

The Catacombs of Paris are a network of tunnels and caves that have been used as a burial ground for centuries. The earliest recorded use of the Catacombs dates back to the early 4th century, when the remains of Saint Marcellus were interred there. Since then, millions of Parisians have been buried in the Catacombs, which now contain the remains of over six million people.

The Catacombs were originally created as a way to alleviate overcrowding in the city’s cemeteries. In the 18th century, the overcrowding became so severe that the city’s cemeteries were often referred to as “the great open-air charnel houses of Paris.” In 1780, the city began moving the remains of Parisians from the cemeteries to the tunnels and caves of the Catacombs.

The Catacombs are located underground, and span a distance of nearly 300 kilometers. They are divided into three levels, with the deepest level reaching a depth of 20 meters. The Catacombs are open to the public, and are a popular tourist attraction.

Legends and anecdotes of the catacombs

There are many legends and anecdotes about the catacombs. One legend says that the catacombs are haunted by the ghosts of those who have died in them. Another legend says that the catacombs are the gateway to the underworld. Anecdotes about the catacombs include stories of people getting lost in them and never being seen again.

Visit to the Catacombs of Paris (tours)

You can book a tour from the oficial website: www.catacombes.paris.fr/en

The Catacombs of Paris are a network of tunnels and caves that run underneath the city of Paris. They were used as burial grounds for centuries, and the bones of over six million people are thought to be buried there.

The Catacombs are open to the public for tours, and visitors can walk through a small section of the tunnels. The tours last for about an hour, and visitors are advised to wear comfortable shoes as the floors can be uneven.

What will you see in the Catacombs of Paris?

The Catacombs of Paris are a network of subterranean tunnels and chambers that run under the city of Paris, France. The catacombs are estimated to hold the remains of 6 million people, and were used as a burial ground from the late 18th century until the early 19th century. Today, the Catacombs are a popular tourist attraction, and are a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

What we don’t know about the Catacombs

The Catacombs are a network of tunnels and chambers beneath the streets of Paris, France. They were used to store the bones of dead people from cemeteries in the city. The Catacombs are now a tourist attraction.

There is a lot that we don’t know about the Catacombs. For example, we don’t know how old they are. Some people say that they date back to the Roman era, while others say that they were built in the 18th century. We also don’t know how deep they go. Some estimates say that the Catacombs are about 20 meters (66 feet) below the ground, while others say that they are up to 30 meters (98 feet) deep.

We also don’t know how many people are buried in the Catacombs. Estimates range from 6 million to 8 million. And we don’t know how many of the bones in the Catacombs are from animals. It is thought that there are about 70,000 animal bones in the Catacombs, but this is just a guess.

So, there is a lot that we don’t know about the Catacombs. But they are still a fascinating place to visit.

Cataphiles

Cataphiles

A Cataphile is a person who loves to explore the Catacombs of Paris. The Catacombs are a network of tunnels and caves that run beneath the city of Paris. They were originally built as limestone quarries, but were later converted into underground burial chambers. The Catacombs are filled with the remains of over six million people.

Cataphiles are a subculture of people who are fascinated by the Catacombs and explore them for fun. They often hold underground parties and events in the Catacombs, and some even live there permanently.

Cataphiles are a relatively small community, but they have a strong online presence. There are several forums and websites dedicated to Cataphilia, and the community is also active on social media.

Important information (timetables)

The Catacombs are an underground burial site in Paris, France. They are open daily from 9.45am to 8.30pm, except Mondays and public holidays. Last admission is at 7.30pm. The Catacombs are located in the 14th arrondissement, near the Denfert-Rocherau metro station.

Tips and advice for your visit to the Catacombs

The Catacombs are a network of tunnels and chambers beneath the streets of Paris, France. The ossuary holds the remains of more than six million people and is one of the largest cemeteries in the world.

There are a few things to keep in mind when visiting the Catacombs. Firstly, the tunnels are dark and damp, so wear comfortable shoes and bring a jacket. Secondly, the Catacombs are extremely popular, so it’s best to buy tickets in advance. Finally, remember to respect the dead and refrain from taking photos or videos inside the ossuary.

Roundup

The Catacombs of Paris are a network of subterranean tunnels and caves that were used to store the bones of some six million people. The catacombs were created in the 18th century to alleviate overcrowding in the city’s cemeteries. The tunnels are located 20 metres (65 ft) below ground and are only accessible via a narrow, spiral staircase.